106 Budget Saving Tips in 60 Minutes!

On Wednesday, January 18, our friends at Collinson Publishing/Rejuvenate are hosting a live one hour webinar for meeting planners. The webinar is FREE and promises to provide listeners with at least 106 budget saving tips. Even if you only take way a couple of ideas that work for your church or ministry, it could still be time well spent. We encourage you to check it out before it’s too late.

The webinar is scheduled to begin at 2:00 PM EST. For more information, click here. To register, click here.

 

Great Tips for Communication & Inspiration

Rejuvenate Magazine is another great resource for Christian meeting planners and in a recent issue, they published “The all out no holds barred straight forward fundamental carefully chosen feverishly compiled complete list of useful meeting planning advice”, I know it’s a mouth full but great advice none the less. I thought I would break it down by area and we’ll take a few months to get thru all of it and maybe even add some of our own. For those of you who can’t wait, click here.

Communication

  • Don’t be afraid to stay in communication. Be willing to ask basic questions like ‘How do you like to keep in touch?’ Some people are phone people and others prefer e-mails. – Pat Davis, The Protestant Women of the Chapel
  • Remember the old real estate axiom – location, location, location? Well, think instead: communication, communication, communication. – Rachel Swartzendruber Miller, Mennonite Church USA
  • It seems obvious to do a site visit for an event, but sometimes there isn’t adequate funding – especially for new events – to travel and see the facility beforehand. This can cause major issues. To lessen those problems, communicate all your needs to the host location and facility beforehand, especially if you don’t see the site in advance. – Will Engle, American Volleyball Coaches Association

Inspiration

  • Enjoy the journey, and know where you are going and leading. You can’t do it alone; travel in the direction that God leads you. – Larry D. Collins, North American Christian Convention
  • If you believe in what you’re doing, just keep on pushing forward toward it. Look at your marketing and pray for ideas that don’t cost a dime. – Amy Cato, Lifeway
  • We need to shift our thinking from building programs to building relationships with kids. – Hank Hilliard, Young People’s Ministries
  • We all wish to be good stewards. If we really take seriously what we understand as our role as humans responsible for God’s creation, then there is a moral and theological obligation for people of faith to take care of what we have been given. – David Melton, North Georgia Conference of the United Methodist Church

What do you think? Do you have any additional advice on Communication & Inspiration you’d like to share? We would love to hear from you.

Advice reprinted with permission from Collinson Media and Events – http://www.rejuvenatemeetings.com/.

Handling Trade Shows & Volunteers

Rejuvenate Magazine is another great resource for Christian meeting planners and in a recent issue, they published “The all out no holds barred straight forward fundamental carefully chosen feverishly compiled complete list of useful meeting planning advice”,  I know it’s a mouth full but great advice none the less.  I thought I would break it down by area and we’ll take a few months to get thru all of it and maybe even add some of our own.  For those of you who can’t wait,  click here.

Trade Shows

  • Give out trinkets (pens, magnets, paperweights, etc.) with the date of next year’s event on it.  – Susan Perry, The Perry Group
  • When it comes to sponsorship, if you don’t have the time to invest in it or don’t have the skill set to organize it, outsource it.  – Louise M. Felsher, CMP, meeting and event consultant
  • This positive environment is composed of many small details. Putting down carpet, for example, creates a more comfortable environment. As a result, they may stay on the show floor two or three hours longer, making them more likely to spend more.  – Susan Friedmann, “Meeting & Event Planning For Dummies”

Volunteers

  • Try to get people within your organization to volunteer. If they have a reason to come and get something out of it, they will be more likely to be excited about volunteering.  – Stephanie Hudson, Providence Events
  • Just because someone is willing to step up to the plate doesn’t mean that he or she will be a productive volunteer. You want to know how they get along with people and work on a team. For big events, a selection team can help to weed out inappropriate candidates and let them down gently without having it seem personal. Just accepting someone who expresses interest in volunteering can sometimes do more harm than good if that person alienates or undermines others on the team. I would rather have eight really good volunteers than 25 I’m not sure about.  – Hank Hilliard, Young People’s Ministries
  • Rather than referring to them as volunteers, we call them conference assistants. The team of assistants dons staff vests for events. It is important to empower volunteers to offer quality and effective customer service.  – Robin Kluever, International Network of Children’s Ministry

What do you think?  Do you have any additional advice on Trade Shows & Volunteers you’d like to share?  We would love to hear from you.

Advice reprinted with permission from Collinson Media and Events – http://www.rejuvenatemeetings.com/.

8 Ideas for Youth Events

We’ve talked about Rejuvenate Marketplace here before and the value to Christian meeting planners who attend.  Rejuvenate Magazine is another great resource for Christian meeting planners and in a recent issue, they published “The all out no holds barred straight forward fundamental carefully chosen feverishly compiled complete list of useful meeting planning advice”,  I know it’s a mouth full but great advice none the less.  I thought I would break it down by area and we’ll take a few months to get thru all of it and maybe even add some of our own.  For those of you who can’t wait,  click here.

Youth Events

  • Inviting the community to come together to be a part of youth events is important. There are a number of local networks of churches. The National Network of Youth Ministries is a great place to start to find other churches in the area.  – Ken Allen, Dare2Share
  • Accommodating teens’ biorhythms means starting morning sessions around 10:30 and letting kids stay up later. Setting up expectations before youth arrive on site is important. Kids get missional if you cast them in that light, and a little positive peer pressure goes a long way.  – Mark Matlock, Youth Specialties
  • The first thing we do is talk to the hotel to find out who else will be there and what else is going on at that time. We’ve had hotels tell us honestly that there are weeks we don’t really want to come.  – Chuck Wallace, Student Venture, Campus Crusade for Christ
  • We make sure all doors to the event space are locked except for one set where parents drop off their kids and another set where parents pick up their kids. At registration, parents sign their kids in and get a pass that allows them to enter the room. No pass, no entrance.  – Nita Leckenby, Children’s Conferences International
  • Look for a band or worship leader who is humble and prays while leading, has a certain level of professional skill and understands they are not doing a concert but leading people to God in prayer.  – Scott Anthony, St. Joseph and St. Patrick parishes
  • Everything this generation deals with is based on technology. To be relevant, use video, multimedia, Internet, social media, text messaging – anything to do with technology because that is how kids today relate to the world.  – Marquis Boone, Real Anointed Worshippers
  • You need to be intentional and have a team of people dedicated only to promoting green initiatives. It is something that interests youth of today so much.  – Kymone Hinds, Central States Youth Ministries
  • Anyone who works with children at events needs to fill out a written application, which should be followed up by checking references and a criminal background check.  – Joy Melton, author, lawyer and minister

What do you think?  Do you have any additional advice on Youth Events you’d like to share?  We would love to hear from you.

Advice reprinted with permission from Collinson Media and Events – http://www.rejuvenatemeetings.com/.

5 Thoughts on The Industry

Rejuvenate Magazine is another great resource for Christian meeting planners and in a recent issue, they published “The all out no holds barred straight forward fundamental carefully chosen feverishly compiled complete list of useful meeting planning advice”,  I know it’s a mouth full but great advice none the less.  I thought I would break it down by area and we’ll take a few months to get thru all of it and maybe even add some of our own.  For those of you who can’t wait,  click here.

The Industry

  • If there’s anything you can do to help the planner before or after you at a hotel or facility, then do it. Work with other planners to make their jobs easier. It always comes back to you one way or another.  – Jeff Johnston, American Contract Bridge League
  • Association memberships are expensive. Not only is there a yearly membership fee, but there are luncheons and other monthly events that cost money to attend. Instead of joining every association that may fit your need, focus on one that could bring you the most benefit, and once you chose that one association, get involved.  – Christine Doyle, Meeting Planning For You
  • Travelers should always plan for a trip to last a couple days longer than they anticipate. That means bringing extra money or credit cards that you can put a room on. When you are prepared, you aren’t as stressed by an unexpected situation.  – Thelma Goodwin, Usher Association
  • Rely on your CVB as much as possible.They have a wealth of information to share and services they can provide. For big events, you actually become really good friends because you’ve worked together so much. They really can put the world at your fingertips, and anything that you need in that city, they can help you find.  – Sheri Clemmer, 59th Session of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists
  • Don’t brush off anyone. You never know when that destination or service will turn out to be the exact fit you’ve been looking for.  – Dean Jones, Connect and Rejuvenate Marketplace

What do you think?  Do you have any additional advice on the Christian Meeting Planning Industry you’d like to share?  We would love to hear from you.

Advice reprinted with permission from Collinson Media and Events – http://www.rejuvenatemeetings.com/.

6 Notes on Security

Rejuvenate Magazine is another great resource for Christian meeting planners and in a recent issue, they published “The all out no holds barred straight forward fundamental carefully chosen feverishly compiled complete list of useful meeting planning advice”,  I know it’s a mouth full but great advice none the less.  I thought I would break it down by area and we’ll take a few months to get thru all of it and maybe even add some of our own.  For those of you who can’t wait,  click here.

Security

  • From the moment we first consider a city, we look at the experiences of other groups in the area, crime statistics, even weather conditions.  – Jerry Mapstone, Life Impact Ministries
  • Make sure the hotel and meeting center has a good paper shredder and find out what security measures are practical.  – Joan Eisenstodt, hospitality consultant and educator
  • A force majeure provision should be included in every contract. It is also important to include a catchall provision such as the following: “or any other cause beyond the parties’ control.”  – Barbara Dunn, hospitality attorney
  • Make sure all exits are clearly visible, and all aisles, walkways and exits are clear of obstructions. Make sure all drapery and scenic material have been fireproofed.  – Scott Reagles, Initial Production Group
  • Tell attendees about emergency plans during housekeeping sessions.  – Joan Eisenstodt, hospitality consultant and educator
  • Partner with law enforcement agencies in the early planning stages for a better understanding of any overall threats, including recent crime information, as well as potential threats directed towards either the event or the facility.  – Bonnie Wallsh, Bonnie Wallsh Associates

What do you think?  Do you have any additional advice on Security you’d like to share?  We would love to hear from you.

Advice reprinted with permission from Collinson Media and Events – http://www.rejuvenatemeetings.com/.

5 Tips for Going Green

Rejuvenate Magazine is another great resource for Christian meeting planners and in a recent issue, they published “The all out no holds barred straight forward fundamental carefully chosen feverishly compiled complete list of useful meeting planning advice”,  I know it’s a mouth full but great advice none the less.  I thought I would break it down by area and we’ll take a few months to get thru all of it and maybe even add some of our own.  For those of you who can’t wait,  click here.

Going Green

  • Encourage and award attendees for going green. Hand out “I was caught green-handed” buttons or offer contests for practices like carpooling and recycling, allowing the winners to go first in the food lines.  – Nancy Wilson and Cathy Kretz, CMPs, from their green meetings webinar
  • Have processes in place to make sure everyone understands their goals. Document everything you’ve done, the good and the bad. The most effective learning tools are the barriers and obstacles you’ve overcome.  – Kimberly Lewis, U.S. Green Building Council
  • Going green is not just one step. It’s a journey, and it’s important to set up a green team to come up with what your organization’s goals are and to assess your progress, your failures and your successes.  – Tracey Messina, Convene Green Alliance
  • Many green practices can be cost-saving or cost-neutral for both the supplier and the planner, including using china service rather than disposable dishware at meals, requesting that hotels change linens every other day and moving registration online to drastically reduce the cost of postage and paper.  – Amy Spatrisano, Meeting Strategies Worldwide
  • Make sure extra food is being donated and promote that fact to raise awareness among attendees and your organization.  – Joan Eisenstodt, hospitality consultant and educator

What do you think?  Do you have any additional advice on Going Green you’d like to share?  We would love to hear from you.

Advice reprinted with permission from Collinson Media and Events – http://www.rejuvenatemeetings.com/.

5 Things to Communicate with Speakers

Rejuvenate Magazine is another great resource for Christian meeting planners and in a recent issue, they published “The all out no holds barred straight forward fundamental carefully chosen feverishly compiled complete list of useful meeting planning advice”,  I know it’s a mouth full but great advice none the less.  I thought I would break it down by area and we’ll take a few months to get thru all of it and maybe even add some of our own.  For those of you who can’t wait,  click here.

Speakers

  • Tell a speaker the goals of your program and what you want to achieve. My story is my story. I have my core speech, but I’m always happy to adapt it to meet the needs of the group.  – Joan Brock, speaker
  • Talk with your speaker of choice about the timing of their presentation. Comedy is useless before 10 a.m. so don’t even bother earlier than that.  – Anita Renfroe, speaker
  • If your conference depends on a key speaker as an attendance draw, the speaker must be well known and able to talk about major issues that relate to the majority of your group. Appoint two or three people to research speakers and musicians. Get recommendations from other groups that have done similar retreats. Most program directors are willing to share information and ways to contact speakers and musicians. Word-of-mouth is usually the best way to find the professionals you want.  – Larry Beatty, Jumonville Christian camp and retreat
  • Request that speakers send you a list of six people you can call for a personal phone reference. When they give you the list, be sure to call the last three on the list. This will ensure that you are getting a true assessment, since most people will list the best references first.  – Dallas Teague Snider, author and speaker
  • Tell all the speakers one month before, one hour before and just before they speak how much time they have. Let them know that they will receive a sign (timer) to know when time is up. With prestigious speakers, this detail is sometimes avoided. Don’t avoid the discussion; they will understand.  – Pegine Echevarria, author and speaker

What do you think?  Do you have any additional advice on Speakers you’d like to share?  We would love to hear from you.

Advice reprinted with permission from Collinson Media and Events – http://www.rejuvenatemeetings.com/.

Planner to Planner: 8 Good Tech Tips

We’ve talked about Rejuvenate Marketplace here before and the value to Christian meeting planners who attend.  Rejuvenate Magazine is another great resource for Christian meeting planners and in a recent issue, they published “The all out no holds barred straight forward fundamental carefully chosen feverishly compiled complete list of useful meeting planning advice”,  I know it’s a mouth full but great advice none the less.  I thought I would break it down by area and we’ll take a few months to get thru all of it and maybe even add some of our own.  For those of you who can’t wait,  click here.

Technology

  • Ask the hotel or conference center for power cords left in lost and found. Keep them at the registration desk in case attendees need to recharge their electronic devices. They’ll thank you profusely.  – Cate Smith, Education Law Association
  • Mass text messages or text blasts are a great way to keep your group informed during an event.  – Natalie Konowal, Sigma Chi Fraternity
  • Engaging an audience ensures continuous attentiveness during longer presentations. During a 60-minute presentation, getting audience feedback after each 20-minute span of time can ensure that attendees’ brains remain in the “active” rather than “passive” mode so they retain more information.  – Ray Hansen, IML audience response systems
  • If you have decided that you are going to implement an event community, you need to teach people how to use it. You need to have a session and allow people to ask questions and really be patient, speak in plain English and not text terms. Do a one-hour Twitter 101 session to really give people an overview; it helps them not only for the event but it teaches people a new skill. – Jessica Levin, Seven Degrees Communications
  • Go beyond Facebook and Twitter and utilize platforms like LinkedIn and Second Life to promote your event and get attendees involved.  – Martin Hess, American Club Association
  • Provide a website widget of the Twitter hashtag that users can post on blogs, personal pages and websites. This can be done using Twitter Fall, TwitterFountain, TweetGrid or Widgetbox.  – Jeff Hurt, Velvet Chainsaw Consulting
  • I could have my intern Twitter great things about us all week long, but when someone else Twitters about us who’s a trusted source, that is what’s most significant. Developing solid relationships with influential people in your niche audience who use social media is an incredible use of your time and energy. Those people, when they talk about you, they are going to drive attention and traffic in your direction.  – Matt Markins, Randall House
  • You have to rethink, reposition and promote a dream that will meet the needs of people that attend and equip them to make a difference in line with your mission statement. Traditional marketing strategies are not enough. Viral marketing through networkers who have a vested interest in the success of the event is crucial.  – Martin Deacon, Call2All

What do you think?  Do you have any additional advice on Technology you’d like to share?  We would love to hear from you.

Advice reprinted with permission from Collinson Media and Events – http://www.rejuvenatemeetings.com/.

Planner to Planner: 4 Great Food and Beverage Ideas

Rejuvenate Magazine is another great resource for Christian meeting planners and in a recent issue, they published “The all out no holds barred straight forward fundamental carefully chosen feverishly compiled complete list of useful meeting planning advice”,  I know it’s a mouth full but great advice none the less.  I thought I would break it down by area and we’ll take a few months to get thru all of it and maybe even add some of our own.  For those of you who can’t wait,  click here.

Food & Beverage

  • Any meeting planner who wants to get the biggest bang for the buck should always talk to the chef. And don’t let any salesperson say you can’t talk to the chef.  – Janet Pickover, Site Inspections Plus
  • I sit down and start creating a budget. I’ll start with a wish list – everything I want to have. I’ll see what money we have in sponsorships and see how realistic that wish list is. If it’s not, then we start paring it down.  – Chrysta Bolinger, Catholic Campus Ministry Association
  • Move away from lengthy meals to more action stations, where attendees can mingle and sample.  – Giorgi Di Lemis, Gaylord Hotels
  • Always use a trained bartender. This is not the place to cut corners.  – Bonnie Wallsh Associates

What do you think?  Do you have any additional advice on Food & Beverage you’d like to share?  We would love to hear from you.

Advice reprinted with permission from Collinson Media and Events – http://www.rejuvenatemeetings.com/.