Four Things to Consider When You Make a Mistake

 

If you watched The Academy Awards this year, in the midst of candy and donuts parachuting down to guests and a tour bus bringing unsuspecting sightseers right in front of the star-studded crowd, your viewing experience came to an abrupt halt as La La Land directors were interrupted during their acceptance speeches for “Best Picture.” The reason? They weren’t the actual winners. The wrong movie had been announced. It was a mistake of epic proportions, as the crew from La La Land handed over the award they mistakenly received to the actual winners.

Mistakes happen. They are inevitable. Some are, unfortunately, a bit more visible to the world, such as the Oscar mix-up. Other mistakes are ones that can easily be hidden. Regardless of the situation or the error, here are four takeaways from how the Oscars handled their embarrassing mistake:

  1. Own your mistake. As soon as you realize you have made an error, let others know. A natural response is to try to hide it. Don’t try to cover it up. This will only lead to greater problems down the road. The sooner you own your mistake, the quicker a correction can be made.
  2. Correct your mistake. After you confess your error, do what you can to make it right. While this initially may cause a bit of confusion or questioning, making the situation right is, for lack of a better phrase, the right thing to do.
  3. Investigate your mistake. There may be an explanation for the mistake that was made, one you might not immediately see. Social media was quick to blame the presenters for reading the wrong name at the Oscars when in actuality, they were given the wrong envelope. Make sure you know the entire story before placing blame on a particular person or side.
  4. Learn from your mistake. It goes without saying, when you make a mistake once, you should learn from that mistake and not make it again. After a mistake has been made and corrected, gather those involved and figure out the what, why and how of the error. Put parameters in place so it does not become a repeat situation.

While a simple check of an envelope could have spared many people a lot of unnecessary emotions at The Academy Awards, the fact is, a mistake was made. There are consequences for mistakes, but there are also great learning experiences that can come from them. Next time you make an error, whether in your personal or professional life, consider these four takeaways listed above. Your mistakes do not define you; your response to them will.