11 Popular Posts From The First Half of 2013

Wow! Hard to believe we’re half way thru 2013 already.  We hope and pray your summer is going well. Our summer here at Ridgecrest is off to a roaring start, full of groups and summer activities.  In spite of all the busyness, we thought this might be a good time to catch you up on 11 of the most read posts so far this year. Hopefully you will find a helpful  post you might otherwise have missed…

clothes pins

  1. 5 Gift Ideas For A Women’s Retreat – Giving a gift is a nice (but completely not necessary) gesture that will always encourage memories of the experience. Here are 5 perfect, mostly inexpensive, thoughtful gifts for women.
  2. 5 Tips For Programming Effective Youth Camps – Brian Mills serves as student pastor Long Hollow Baptist Church and is passionate about reaching young people for Christ. Here are his thoughts on how to program your youth camp for maximum spiritual impact.
  3. What’s A Hollow Square? – As in any industry, hotels and conference centers sometimes have a language all their own. Here are some of the key terms a planner needs to know…
  4. A Sample Pre-Event Communication To Your Attendees – Sending out an email, letter or packet to those who register for your event is an excellent idea. Here’s a sample…
  5. 3 Common Social Media Mistakes To Avoid – There are tons of mistakes you can make while using Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media, that will deter customers and fans so we want to help…
  6. 5 Keys To A Great Staff Retreat – Staff retreats can be a strategic part of building a highly productive team. However, the difference between a mediocre staff retreat and a great one is having a good game plan. To help with planning your next staff retreat, here are 5 keys you want to make sure  are part of your plan…
  7. 7 Killer Resources For Event Planners – Books, conferences, articles, and eBooks are waiting to help you better market, organize, and run your next event. Here are some to help get you started…
  8. 7 Questions To Ask Your Event Coordinator – If you’re the group leader or meeting planner, please be sure to take full advantage of all your meeting coordinator has to offer.
  9. 3 Event Must Haves – Want your event to be successful? Here are 3 things you really need to be on top of…
  10. 7 Tips For Getting The Most From A Site Visit – Once you decide to make a site visit, here are 7 tips to help you maximize your time.
  11. Meeting Planner Survival Kit – Many planners need to be prepared to address last minute needs and emergencies. Here is a starter list of items you need to have in your meeting planner survival kit to be prepared at your next event.

Which post have you found most helpful?

 

Top 10 Posts – 2nd Quarter 2012

I think it’s safe to say we’ve entered the dog days of summer and I’m already looking forward to fall. This means the 2nd quarter is behind us and it’s time to share our 10 most read posts over the past 3 months. Hopefully this will help you find a worthy post you might have missed in the past…

  1. 3 Steps To More Productive Brainstorming – Brainstorming with your planning team is a great way to ensure you provide an event your attendees will find engaging and worthwhile.  Here are 3 steps to take that will go a long way to making your next session more productive.
  2. What’s A Hollow Square – As in any industry, hotels and conference centers sometimes have a language all their own. Here’s a little help in translating…
  3. 8 Ideas For Promoting Your Church Retreat –  If you don’t also spend time on strategically promoting your retreat, you may end up with a great retreat that no one attends. With that in mind, here are 8 ideas for helping to promote your upcoming church retreat.
  4. Ridgecrest Recipe:  Rutland Chicken – Have you been looking for something new to do with chicken?  Enjoy and then let us know what you think!
  5. 5 Things To Do AFTER Your Meeting Is Over – Everyone has gone home and you want to relax but here are a few things that still need to be done and will definitely help you in planning future meetings and/or retreats.
  6. Creating A Standout Womens Retreat – A podcast interview with Chris Adams and Betsy Langmade, 2 of LifeWay’s long-time women’s leaders sharing what they’ve learned about planning women’s events.
  7. Meeting Planner Survival Kit – Many planners need to be prepared to address last minute needs and emergencies. Here is a starter list of items you need to have in your meeting planner survival kit to be prepared at your next event.
  8. 3 Tips To Creating An Unforgettable Event – Here are 3 tips on how to turn your event into an unforgettable experience.
  9. 5 Tips For Programming Effective Youth Camps – Brian Mills serves as student pastor Long Hollow Baptist Church and is passionate about reaching young people for Christ. Here are his thoughts on how to program your youth camp for maximum spiritual impact.
  10. 7 Tips For Getting The Most From A Site Visit – Once you decide to make a site visit, here are 7 tips to help you maximize your time.

Which post have you found most helpful?

 

A Refresher on Meeting Room Set Up Styles

When considering options for function room setups, the most important factor is to understand the meeting’s objectives. The design is crucial to making sure goals are met.   With goals and objectives at the forefront, next look at audiovisual requirements, speaker needs and traffic flow, taking into consideration participant safety, comfort and accommodation for people with disabilities.

Here are the standard meeting room set-ups to consider for your next function:

Theater Style
This is the best setup for a large group where writing is not necessary and food is not served. Chairs are set in rows facing the speaker, stage or focal point of the room.

Classroom Style
This setup is best for meetings where attendees need to write or use a computer. It allows for minimal interaction between attendees and is best used for lectures and training meetings. Chairs are set at 6-foot or 8-foot tables facing the presenter.

Conference Style
This format is ideal for smaller groups where attendee interaction is a main objective. Seated around tables, participants have a direct view of their colleagues to facilitate discussions. Specify what type of table arrangements you need based on the objectives of your meeting:

Boardroom: One solid, rectangular table that can be an existing table in a hotel meeting room or created by putting together 30-inch-wide tables. This setup is best for a board of directors meeting with heavy discussions as participants are in closest reach to each other.

U-Shape: Tables are arranged in a horseshoe, which is ideal for meetings that need to facilitate discussion between attendees but also include an audiovisual presentation set at the opening of the “U.”

T-Shape: Best for a panel, presenters or lead management that needs to sit at the top of the “T” and direct the discussion down the length of the tables.

Hollow Square: Best for meetings that do not require an audiovisual presentation. If the hotel has serpentine tables, request a rounded hollow square setup to maximize seating on the ends. If these are not available, straight tables can be placed at an angle creating an angled hollow square setup.

Multi-Sided Shapes: Multi-sided shapes such as a diamond or octagonal are best for larger groups of 20 or more. They comfortably seat nearly every attendee at the end of a table and provide direct sight and voice communication to
participants.

Banquet Style
This setup works best for meetings that require food and beverage service and where participants are asked to break out into small groups. Setup includes 60-, 66- or 72-inch round tables with chairs around the entire table or only on one side.

Have you used another type of set-up, how did it work for you?  Please share your ideas in the comments.

"What's A Hollow Square?"

In my 30 years in the hospitality industry, I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard that question. Truth be told, I’m sure I asked it myself when I was first getting started in my hotel management career.

As in any industry, hotels and conference centers sometimes have a language all their own. This can be pretty frustrating for folks trying to plan a meeting or retreat, especially for those who don’t do it very often. With that in mind, today’s post on meeting room setup will be the first of several dealing with hospitality terminology and operations

  • Hollow square and conference – Tables are set up in a large square, or rectangle. This setup is excellent for interactive discussions and extensive note-taking for groups of 25 or less. Most hotels and conference centers, including Ridgecrest and Glorieta, will have dedicated executive boardrooms for 10-16 people that are ideal for small group meetings.
  • U-shape, T-shape, E-shape – Just as it sounds, tables are set up in a configuration that is similar to the letter. These setups are good for groups of 40 or less where the primary interaction will be with a leader seated at the head of the setup. Seating is typically set on the outside, but seats could also be set on the inside to accommodate more people.
  • Classroom/Schoolroom – Tables are set in rows facing the presenter. This is the most popular setup for medium to large-size lectures. Having participants seated at tables gives them room to spread out and be able to easily take notes. Downside is that it requires a large space. Tables are typically 18″x72″ and will have 3 chairs per table. For large gatherings using a classroom setup, would definitely recommend utilizing staging for the presenter(s) so as to improve sight lines.
  • Theater – Chairs only, set in rows facing presenter. Ideal for large sessions, this setup maximizes the number of people that can fit in the space being used. It’s also a good setup to use before breaking out into discussion groups as the chairs can be easily moved.
  • Rounds – Room is set with round tables (5′ or 6′) and chairs. Generally used for meals and sessions involving small group discussion. Typically, 5′ tables will be set with 8 chairs and 6′ tables with 10 chairs.

This covers the primary room setup terms. Have we missed any? If so, please let us know and we’ll update the post.