20 Ideas for Facebook Live

You’ve decided to utilize Facebook Live in order to market your upcoming event. Where do you go from here? Before making your first live stream, invite your team to a brainstorming session for content ideas. Determine how often and when you want to “go live.” Some videos might involve traveling to a particular location or meeting with a specific person, so developing a master plan will help you map out your marketing strategy.

Make your Facebook Live streams fun and inviting, yet informational and professional. These videos have the potential to draw prospective attendees to your event and enhance the excitement of those already registered.

If you’re having trouble coming up with ideas for live stream content, here are 20 to help you in the brainstorming process:

  1. Take your viewers on a tour of the venue, emphasizing a few of the main event spaces.
  2. Go live in the lobby of the hotel or other housing accommodations you will be using. If possible, interview a general manager or event host at the site for more information about the lodging.
  3. Find a local coffee shop your guests may want to visit and do a live feed onsite.
  4. Interview your keynote speaker about the upcoming event and answer questions live.
  5. Explore different workshops you will offer, providing a short description of each one.
  6. Talk to various workshop teachers about the content they will discuss during their sessions.
  7. Interview your worship leader. As a bonus, see if he or she will perform a song during your live feed.
  8. Showcase merchandise that will be available for sale at your event.
  9. Highlight an activity your group may participate in during the event.
  10. If your event will have a special themed night where participants can dress up, emphasize that by wearing an appropriate costume while discussing your themed night. This will give attendees an idea of what to wear.
  11. Do a “behind the scenes” video while setting up for your event at the venue.
  12. Offer a challenge for your attendees prior to the conference via Facebook Live. Have a special prize for those who complete the challenge.
  13. Highlight someone packing for your conference to help attendees know what to bring.
  14. Introduce your event team.
  15. Interview someone who has been to the event before.
  16. Host a live Q & A session about your upcoming event.
  17. Walk viewers through your event schedule.
  18. Let viewers know the heart behind your event. What makes it special to you?
  19. Showcase a special cause your event supports.
  20. Show viewers how to register for your event.

What ideas do you have for Facebook Live content? Share in the comments section below!

 

Tips for Using Facebook Live to Market Your Event

 

Social media is a great way to market an upcoming event. While there are seemingly countless ways to utilize Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, one of the easiest ways to reach your audience is through live video feed with Facebook Live.

Facebook Live is simple to use. After logging in to Facebook, click on “what’s on your mind” (where you would typically update your status). Click on “Live Video,” type a description, and, when you are ready, “Go Live!”

Facebook offers a few tips on its website when using Facebook Live. These tips are shared below, along with a few comments about how these can enhance your event marketing.

  1. Tell fans when you’re broadcasting ahead of time. Facebook recommends one day’s notice. This is a simple practice to put in place. The day prior, post when you will go live and include a teaser for what you will share.
  2. Go live when you have a strong connection. According to Facebook, Wi-Fi usually works best, but if this isn’t available, a 4G connection will be necessary. If your connection isn’t strong enough, you won’t be able to go live. Test your connection prior to going live, leaving enough time to find a new location if necessary.
  3. Write a catchy description before going live. Grab your audience’s attention by writing a catchy heading. This will appear in the news feed above the video.
  4. Ask viewers to subscribe to Live notifications. They can do this by tapping on the “Follow” button on current live videos or videos that have been live.
  5. Say hello to commentators by name; respond to their comments live. This tip is self-explanatory. If you are taking questions during a Facebook Live event, respond and use the commentator’s name. For example, if “Joe” asks a question, respond with, “Thanks for the question, Joe…”
  6. Broadcast for longer periods of time to reach more people. Facebook recommends at least 10 minutes. While this allows more viewers the chance to tune in live, as a viewer myself, I don’t always have this amount of time when the video is live. If using Facebook Live to market, vary the times, depending on the topic you are discussing. A few minutes could suffice.
  7. Use a closing line to signal the end of the broadcast. For example, you could close with, “Thanks for watching, and we’ll see you at ‘X’ event in ‘x’ days.” Include the event name and the latest countdown.
  8. Be creative and go live often. The possibilities are endless when it comes to content you can use to market an event on Facebook Live. If you plan to go live once a week for a few months prior to the event, you can build momentum and share quality information about your upcoming event.

In addition to these tips, here are a few of my own:

  1. Do a quick run through of your video before you hit “go live.” Live means live. Though you can delete a video after it is posted, you will lose the value of the live video and comments made.
  2. Use a tripod if available. No one wants to watch a shaky video.
  3. Choose a location free from distraction. Make sure the lighting is good. Record a brief video prior to going live. Review the video to see if the location chosen will work well for your Live event.

Stay tuned for our next blog post showcasing content ideas you can use for Facebook Live event marketing.

Ask the Expert: Creating an Event Website

I’m excited to share another installment of our “Ask the Expert” blog series. This week, we will dive into the world of website design. Jess Freeman is an Atlanta-based freelance graphic and web designer. She was named 2015 Gwinnett Chamber Young Entrepreneur of the Year. Jess is a great resource for designing event websites.

  1. I’m planning a retreat for the first time. I want to have a website to share with those who are interested. Where do I start?
    First, you’ll want to decide if you want to use Squarespace or WordPress for your website – there are other platforms, but these two are the most reputable and the easiest to use. Squarespace comes pre-loaded with themes you can choose; you would need to buy a WordPress theme. Then, you’ll need to choose a domain name. This should be no more than 15 characters long.

    The content of your website needs to be organized and flow in a way that makes sense. I always recommend having one to two buttons on each page that will direct the user to the next right step. The buttons will save users from having to scroll back to the top of the page and guide them through your content.

  1. I don’t have pictures from previous events, but I think pictures are important. Where can I find quality stock images at a moderate price?
    Images are indeed very important because they help convey emotion and connect with the viewers. One of the most popular stock photo websites is istockphoto.com, but you will have to do some searching to find photos that aren’t too cliché. CreativeMarket is also a popular resource with more affordable photos but less selection.

    Depending on the type of retreat, you may be able to use free stock photos. Now, to be clear, this does not mean going to Google Images and grabbing pictures – that could get you in a lot of legal trouble. However, there are royalty-free websites like Unsplash.com that have hundreds of great photos that are totally free to use.

    You could also try to work with a local photographer and do a little photo shoot for your website. It’s unlikely they would be able to (or want to) do it for free, but they may be up for a trade! For example, maybe you could list them as a sponsor and put their business card in a swag bag in exchange for some discounted services.

  1. What tips can you give when creating a website name?
    Names can be tricky because it can really set the tone for the event. It’s always best to keep it clear and simple rather than trying to be cute and clever. For example, my church has a “Walking Wisely Weekend” for middle school students. The alliteration makes it fun but still easy to remember. If they ever wanted to create a separate website, it would be easy to leave off “weekend” for a shorter domain.
  1. Is it possible for guests to register and pay online for the event? Any tips on how to do that?
    Thankfully, it is easy to have people register for events right on your website! For Squarespace users, you can set up a “product” as the event registration and get the names and emails of all customers. For WordPress, there are many plugins that can handle this – Event Registration, Event Espresso, Events Manager and many more.

    Another option is to use Eventbrite, a third-party platform. Some prefer Eventbrite because you can send “invitations” to people, you can enable specific seating at your event (like concert seats) and you can integrate it with Facebook. But, of course, they do take a percentage of your sales.

  1. How can I link Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and other social media to my page?
    Squarespace lets you connect your social media profiles and pages seamlessly. You’ll just need to “login” through Squarespace and an icon will appear on your website. For WordPress, it’s also very easy to integrate your social media with the help of plugins. Most of the time, however, your theme will have a spot for you to put links to your social media.

    I don’t recommend displaying social media feeds (like Facebook and Twitter) on your website. This was a popular thing to do many years ago, but it generally makes your site look cluttered and dated. Instagram is one exception, since it is pictures only – but this should be considered carefully, as you want to make sure the photos don’t clash with your website.

    Something I do recommend is having share buttons on your website. This enables people to share your site or your blog posts with just a click of a button. SumoMe and ShareThis are popular plugins that I use with most of my clients.

  1. What are some of your best tips when creating a website?
    One of my favorite tips to tell people is to limit yourself to three colors and three fonts. That doesn’t mean you have to use all three of either, but limit yourself! This will truly help your site feel more cohesive and look professional. Having fewer choices will also speed up the design process because you won’t feel as overwhelmed with options.

    As far as events and ministries go, it’s always important to make sure you’re not too insider-focused. Even if it’s a women’s retreat that you think only current members will want to come to, what if they decided to share it on Facebook and invite friends? The messaging is going to influence whether or not they feel welcome at the event.

A big thank you to Jess for sharing some great information about event website design. You can learn more about Jess and gain even more graphic design wisdom at jesscreatives.com.

Early Bird Registration

Commitmentphobia.  The fear of commitment.  It’s a phenomenon plaguing our churches, small groups and for some, our very own events.  Getting an RSVP for a party a week away can prove a daunting task, much less registration for events months away.  This is a planner’s nightmare!  Pre-registration is essential for adequate preparation; early registration is an added bonus.

Most events will have a registration deadline.  These deadlines will vary based on the type of event you are hosting.  However, if you can provide an “early bird” registration date (prior to the general deadline), this can benefit your planning process.  For many events, numbers determine everything.  By asking people to register ahead of time, you can gauge overall interest, know whether the event should go forward or be cancelled and help in general planning.  For example, you may realize a larger event space, more break-out rooms or a larger hotel block are needed.  If the venue has a minimum financial responsibility that must be meet, you may be able to adjust that based on early interest.

So, how do you get people to commit to an event early in a world full of “commitment-phobes”?  Offer incentives for registering by a certain date.  These can include:

  • A cheaper program fee
  • Preferred seating in large group sessions
  • Meet and greet with the keynote speaker
  • First choice of housing options
  • A separate, expedited check-in line on the day of the event
  • A special gift (t-shirt, tote bag, notebook, etc.)

Make sure you market these early registration promotions well.  Email blasts, social media campaigns and mailers can provide buzz about your event registration.  If prospective attendees see an added benefit to registering early, they may jump at the opportunity to participate.  The more commitment you can get in advance, the more you can fully prepare for your upcoming event.  More commitment can also spur greater event attendance. The more people are talking, the more people will be interested!

Do you have incentive ideas for early registration?  If so, comment below!

 

If Only: Preparing for Future Events

“If only I had a picture of that great activity we did at last year’s retreat…”

Have you ever had this thought when preparing for an event?  You think of things you wish you had as you work on promotional materials, but the opportunity to actually have those has passed.  While organizing an upcoming event, it’s hard to fathom looking ahead to the next event, but, with a little thought, you can save yourself a few “if only” moments down the road.

Here are several ideas you can do during your current event to prepare for future ones:

  1. Take pictures. This is a simple thing to do and a great way to utilize a few volunteers who may be gifted photographers.  Photograph everything – registration, large and small group sessions, candid moments, meals, recreation, free time.  You never know how you might be able to use these photographs in future promotional material.
  2. Get video footage. As with pictures, video everything.  It’s always better to have too much footage from which to draw.  Once the event is over, you can’t recreate these moments.  In addition, by videoing various parts of the retreat, you can see things you might not have noticed because you were in a different spot when they took place.  For example, you might see an easier way to set-up your registration line or find a different way to arrange chairs in your meeting rooms.  It’s similar to an instant replay in sports, only you look at it after the event and can change things for the future.
  3. Interview event attendees. During the event, select several attendees to interview about the actual event.  Ask specific questions about their favorite moments, the accommodations, what they have learned and why others should come in the future.  If there a few people who have had significant life changing moments over the course of the retreat, video their stories.  Having footage of these people, in the moment, at the event location, will carry great weight with potential future guests.
  4. Survey attendees. In addition to gaining information about event details (accommodations, dining facilities, speakers, music, sessions, etc.), ask attendees general questions about their overall experience.  Use their responses as testimonials in promotional material for future retreats.
  5. Observe other events. If other events coincide with yours at the same property, take note of various ways they utilize facilities and incorporate the setting into their programs.  Don’t be afraid to ask their leadership about various ways they program their events.

It is important for all of your guests to sign a waiver giving permission to be photographed or videoed.  This can be included during the registration process.  A simple statement noting that by registering for this event, you acknowledge and agree photos and videos taken may be used in promotional material should suffice.  In securing written testimonials, you can include a statement guests can check regarding whether or not their comments may be published.

What are some ways you prepare for future events during a current one?  Comment below!

 

BlueFire: An Online Tool for Event Registration

Effective registration is crucial for a successful event. First impressions are key, and for many, registering for an event is the first interaction they have with the host organization. As an event planner, an uncomplicated registration process can allow you to spend time on other details.

While it is possible to create your own registration system, there are online programs available that can streamline the process and virtually take care of it for you. BlueFire is one such online service specifically designed for US-based nonprofit, religious or educational organizations. A faith-based company, BlueFire exists to help nonprofits make giving and getting involved easy for their supporters. According to representative Ben Reese, “Our mission as a company is to provide helpful tools for your organizations to collect payments and donations in any way that they choose. This includes only using BlueFire for event registrations, even free events.” (BlueFire was initially launched to help nonprofits accept online donations. Since inception, it has expanded to include benefits such as event registration, as outlined below.)

Signing up for BlueFire is very simple. An easy, step-by-step guide is available on the BlueFire website, gobluefire.com. There are no set-up fees, monthly charges or contracts to sign. Registration with BlueFire includes registration with HaloPays, the payment processor and payment gateway that will be used behind-the-scenes. HaloPays charges a low percentage transaction fee.

After reviewing BlueFire, here are a few benefits:

  • BlueFire easily integrates into your current website.
  • You can set up both free and paid events for your organization. Secure payment by credit, debit or e-check is available.
  • In addition to registration and payment, registrants can also provide information such as t-shirt size, dietary restrictions, etc.
  • It is possible to take payments on location with a USB credit card swiper.
  • BlueFire supports unlimited administrator, webmaster and accountant-level accounts, allowing organizations to provide appropriate access to any of their members.
  • You can easily monitor registrations and payments in one spot.
  • BlueFire is PCI-DSS compliant.

Reese also adds, “With BlueFire, our organizations don’t just receive a flexible and robust event registration system. They also receive a powerful donation and payment system with user-friendly reporting and reconciliation tools, reliable 3-day batch processing and the support of an organization that wants to see Jesus Christ magnified.”

When it’s time for your next event registration, don’t feel like you have to begin from scratch. There are tools designed to help your registration be as successful as possible.

These opinions and thoughts are my own, and I have not been compensated from BlueFire for this blog post…I just really like their software!

 

Newsjacking and How To Do It For Your Event

The New Rules of Marketing and PR by David Scott defines newsjacking as “inserting your ideas into a breaking news story by writing a real-time blog post or shooting a video to interest reporters and generate coverage.”

Here’s an example of what this might look like.  Imagine you are organizing an event for women in leadership. Then, on the morning news you see a big story on the strain childcare costs are placing on women and their families. Now is your chance to write a blog post, or send out a twitter message, or record a quick video interview with an informed response to the topic.  Your PR person/team can help you get this response to appropriate people, like a local news team or radio station.  You help provide great local information on an emerging story/topic and your event gets some recognition.

For any event you can brainstorm topics that might be good newsjacking possibilities.  Take the time to talk about it with your event team, and make a list together. The key to newsjacking is great information and speed of response.  A news cycle doesn’t last very long, at the most 24-48 hours. You need to notice a related topic, produce high quality content, and get it out there rapidly.

Author David Scott calls this “developing a real time mindset”.  He points out that most businesses only draw from past or future experiences, and that those who jump in to the happening now arena can set themselves apart and enjoy some nice advertising and attention.

Try this out, and be willing to fail and learn from your mistakes, you’ll improve over time and you’ll be developing a marketing tool that not many businesses have grasped.  Have you ever newsjacked? Please tell us how and what happened.

Sharing Stories During Your Event

Stories are powerful, especially personal stories.  How can you harness the power of personal stories at your next event?

  1. Identify the type of story you need.  Stories of hope? Survival? A journey of faith? Try to find a phrase that describes the type of story you are looking for.  If you are too specific, you’ll knock most people out of the running.  Try to walk the line between a strong theme and an overly specific one.
  2. Decide how you want to share the stories.  Will you be handing these out in written form, as video interviews, spoken from a podium, shared in small groups?
  3. Identify your pool of potential storytellers.  Everyone attending the event? The leadership? The speakers?
  4. Contact your potential storytellers in advance.  This could be an email, or an in person request the day before it is time to share the stories.  What you shouldn’t do is suddenly announce that people will be sharing their stories with no advance warning.  People need time to recall and reflect.  The amount of time you give is often related to the format you’ll be sharing stories in.  For example, sharing in a group –participants might only need 24 hours notice.  However, to distribute stories in a written handout, you’d need to collect the stories, compile them, and print them out.
  5. Collect and refine.  Be careful during this stage.  Personal stories are—very personal, but you need to check them over to make sure they are appropriate and on topic.  Some people begin telling their “story of hope” and end up down a rabbit trail.  You may need to guide storytellers back to the main topic.  And hopefully you will have provided an idea of length- word count, space or time restrictions, at the beginning.
  6. Distribute and enjoy.  This is the part you’ve been waiting for.  The power of personal stories is reverberating around the room.  Event attendees are seeing the topic in a new light, and how it might be fleshed out in real life.

Using personal stories takes quite a bit of time and effort, but it is worth it!  How do you use these types of stories in your event marketing or gatherings?

Valuable Content You Don’t Have To Write

You know your event page could draw more internet traffic if it held high value content. But you’re not an expert on the topic of the event. Who could create a well-written, timely, relevant piece that would show up on searches performed by your target audience? Fortunately, you identified experts in the target field when you chose someone known and respected by your specific audience– your event speakers!

Start with a short email or phone discussion with your speakers. Have they written anything recently they think the audience would benefit from? An article, a report, an excerpt from an upcoming book? If it has been previously published they might need to seek permission from the publisher to share it on your site. If they haven’t produced anything relevant, ask if they’d be willing to. What should you ask for? It depends on the topic and audience. Brainstorm together. Even small things like a template, checklist or one page industry overview can communicate valuable information and show off expertise.

If your speaker(s) balk at the idea of sharing or producing content, see if they’d be willing to participate in a live webchat Q&A session, or webinar. It is very appealing to audiences to have specific questions answered by an industry expert, and you can record the session and produce a transcript, both to be posted to your event homepage.

All of these options help create valuable content for your event page that you don’t have to personally write and research. Once you have some high value content, be sure to highlight it on your site, making it clearly understandable what it is, who it is for, and how to download or view it. Expert produced content is very appealing for audiences and says to potential event registrants “We know what you need and we can provide high value information.”

Beyond the “Hello, My Name Is…”

We recently blogged about effectively designing name badges.  When done right, name badges can be a great tool for your event.  When done incorrectly, they can be a distraction and something attendees purposefully “forget” to wear.  Name badges are often considered a necessary evil, but they don’t have to be!

Here are a few ways you can utilize name badges for more than their intended purpose.

  1. Meal Tickets.  If the event is being held in a location requiring meal tickets for entry into the dining facility, consider using name badges to serve that purpose.  Talk with the event host to see if this is a possibility.  This is best utilized if the entire group is on the same meal schedule; however, there are ways to differentiate between guests with varying meal plans.  Consider a different color lanyard or name badge background for each meal plan.
  2. VIPs.  Do you have particular guests that might need “special attention?”  Perhaps these people can charge items on the conference tab, such as at the location’s coffee shop or office center.  Certain guests might need easy access to backstage areas or the green room.  Attach a badge ribbon or sticker to the name badge of these people in order to differentiate them from other attendees.
  3. Small Groups.  Will guests break out into pre-arranged small groups during the event?  Note the group an attendee will be in on the corner of the name badge.  This will take a little extra preparation time, but it is an easy way to quickly divide into groups.  (How many times have you tried to number off a group only to find half of the people forget their number by the end of the line?  This is a helpful way to solve that dilemma!)

Name badges serve a primary purpose:  they tell us your name.  With a little creativity, however, you can make use of these conference staples for additional purposes.  Keep these two things in mind if you want to go “beyond the name badge.”  First, too much information can distract from the name.  Choose one or two extras to add, if needed.  Second, and most importantly, the key in successful extra uses of a name badge is communication between your leadership and your event host location.  For example, don’t assume you can use name badges as meal tickets without talking with the host location.  (And, if you are the host location, make sure you communicate with the dining facility if the typical meal ticket required is done differently.)

Have you used name badges for something extra in an event?  If so, share those ideas with us in the comments section.