Pre-Event Communication: More Than Just an Email

One of my favorite things to do each day is to check the mail. There is always a glimmer of hope that someone might have taken the time to write me a quick note. Typically, it’s just bills. Every once in a while, though, I get that sweet handwritten surprise. My husband doesn’t see the point in sending a letter when you could just as easily type an email. On the other hand, I will spend ten minutes looking for an email address to avoid calling someone, while my husband would just as soon make the call immediately. Bottom line: we all like to communicate in different ways.

This difference should find its way into our event planning. Because different people communicate in different ways, you should incorporate various means of correspondence with event attendees prior to an event. Here are a few ways you can utilize these types of communication. I would recommend using a minimum of three, but realize it would be great to try your hand at all of them.

  • Email is one of the simplest communication tools. You can easily send mass emails through programs such as MailChimp. Consider sending an email each month prior to your event with important information, event updates, and highlights of keynote speakers, worship leaders, and breakout sessions.
  • Phone calls. In an age of smartphones at our fingertips, we are often never more than a phone call away. Depending on the size of your conference, it may not be feasible to personally call each attendee, but if you can, consider calling and letting your attendees know you are excited they are coming and ask if they have any questions.
  • Text messages. In your registration process, ask for permission to send text messages pertaining to the conference. If a guest agrees, place his/her number on a mass texting list to use to send pertinent event information or last-minute updates. Mass texting services are available through a variety of companies at different price points. Do your research to find the one best for you.
  • Handwritten notes. Simple, handwritten notes letting your attendees know you are excited they are coming to the event adds a very personal touch to your event communication. Even a formal note or card with a handwritten line at the bottom carries a certain level of intimacy rather than just a form letter with a stamped signature. If you don’t have time to write a personal message, consider having the retreat leadership team personally sign each note.
  • Social media. Regardless of the size of your event, you need to be on social media. Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are all great tools to communicate event details to your attendees, as well as create buzz for others considering attending your event. This is a simple way to begin networking, allow event attendees to correspond with each other, and incorporate special extras like contests and giveaways.

Communication with your event attendees will take time. Engage a team of volunteers to help with this task. Recruit volunteers who love to make phone calls (yes, they do exist) or write notes to aide you in your event correspondence.

How you communicate prior to your event has the potential to move your event from good to great. There is a thin line between over-communication and under-communication. Too much and your attendees will get annoyed. Too little and your event may lose momentum. Work diligently to find the right balance; your attendees will appreciate the ways you reach out to keep them updated and excited about the upcoming event.

 

Your Thoughts?

*