How to Attend an Event as an Event Planner

Last week my family attended a local baseball game. Around the third inning of the game, the large, digital screen started acting strangely. I was quick to comment on this event failure to my husband, and we discussed what might be done to fix it. That’s the event planner in me. Anytime I see something go wrong at an event I’m attending, I try to figure out a way to fix it, or at least think of what I would do if I was in the planner’s shoes.

It’s hard to turn off the “event planner” inside you when you attend a function you haven’t planned. However, especially when it comes to spiritual retreats and training events, it’s important to sometimes simply attend and enjoy, without the pressure of planning and executing.

If you are attending an event rather than planning it, keep these tips in mind:

  • You need spiritual refreshment. While it is possible to worship and be spiritually renewed during your planned events, it is hard. Something always interferes. The room is too cold. The speaker is running late. The video doesn’t play on cue. Someone is complaining about something. If you have the joy of attending an event as a guest, soak in the time you have without the added stress. Allow your spirit to be renewed.
  • Be reminded that mistakes will happen, but they are often unnoticed by most attendees. They happen with events you plan. They will happen with events you attend. As an attendee, realize mistakes happen, and see how, in the grand scheme of things, they are often not as big of a deal as you make them when you are the event planner. You will notice some of the smaller mistakes easily, but try to focus on the bigger picture, realizing most people don’t notice the small mistakes.
  • Take notes. It’s okay to “borrow” good ideas from other people. One great thing about attending events outside your own is for a different perspective. You have great ideas, but others do too. Learn from them. There may be ideas you can incorporate into future events.
  • Enjoy yourself! It’s okay to have fun at someone else’s event! Meet new people, experience new things, and be willing to let loose a little. After all, you aren’t in charge, and no one is looking to you for the answers.
  • Make connections. Introduce yourself to the event planner. Perhaps you can build a relationship where you trade event registrations in the future. For example, you could comp the registration fee for the event planner at one of your events in exchange for comped registration at one of their events.

Earlier this year I had the privilege of attending a writer’s conference as an attendee rather than a planner. It was an amazing feeling walking into the auditorium, realizing I had no responsibilities for the evening except to enjoy myself, worship, and learn. And, though it was hard to turn off the event planner mindset at first, I quickly became engrossed in the conference as a participant. And, it was a blessing!

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