Early Bird Registration

Commitmentphobia.  The fear of commitment.  It’s a phenomenon plaguing our churches, small groups and for some, our very own events.  Getting an RSVP for a party a week away can prove a daunting task, much less registration for events months away.  This is a planner’s nightmare!  Pre-registration is essential for adequate preparation; early registration is an added bonus.

Most events will have a registration deadline.  These deadlines will vary based on the type of event you are hosting.  However, if you can provide an “early bird” registration date (prior to the general deadline), this can benefit your planning process.  For many events, numbers determine everything.  By asking people to register ahead of time, you can gauge overall interest, know whether the event should go forward or be cancelled and help in general planning.  For example, you may realize a larger event space, more break-out rooms or a larger hotel block are needed.  If the venue has a minimum financial responsibility that must be meet, you may be able to adjust that based on early interest.

So, how do you get people to commit to an event early in a world full of “commitment-phobes”?  Offer incentives for registering by a certain date.  These can include:

  • A cheaper program fee
  • Preferred seating in large group sessions
  • Meet and greet with the keynote speaker
  • First choice of housing options
  • A separate, expedited check-in line on the day of the event
  • A special gift (t-shirt, tote bag, notebook, etc.)

Make sure you market these early registration promotions well.  Email blasts, social media campaigns and mailers can provide buzz about your event registration.  If prospective attendees see an added benefit to registering early, they may jump at the opportunity to participate.  The more commitment you can get in advance, the more you can fully prepare for your upcoming event.  More commitment can also spur greater event attendance. The more people are talking, the more people will be interested!

Do you have incentive ideas for early registration?  If so, comment below!

 

Meeting Room Setups

You’ve planned the perfect event, selected the perfect location and now you have to turn in your meeting room configurations to your site.  How do you decide what is best and what do all of the configuration types mean? Here is a quick guide to the site lingo that should help you as you work on your details.

  • Theater:  Appropriate for large sessions and short lectures that do not require extensive note taking. This is a convenient setup to use before breaking into discussion groups because chairs can be moved.
  • Classroom:  A desirable setup for medium size lectures. This configuration requires a relatively large room. Tables provide attendees with space for spreading out materials and taking notes.
  • U-shape:  Appropriate for groups of fewer than 40 people. These are best for interaction with a leader seated at the head of the setup. Audiovisual equipment is usually set up at the open end of the seating.
  • Rounds:  Generally used for meals and sessions involving small group discussions. A five foot round table seats eight people comfortably. A six foot round table seats 10 people comfortably.
  • Reception:  Creating an environment for networking with others by leaving the room open typically with stations of food and beverage and seating for about a quarter of your attendees.
  • Hollow Square or Conference:  Appropriate for interactive discussions and note taking sessions for fewer than 25 people.
  • Boardroom:  A lot of facilities have special rooms for small board meetings with a single boardroom table comfortably seating 10-14 people typically equipped with full audiovisual capabilities, a writing board or flip chart.

Remember you might need to specify what you are thinking when you are making arrangements with your location site (as most sites will block space to accommodate the numbers you are requesting in a theater setup) to ensure you are getting the space needed to accommodate your event.

If Only: Preparing for Future Events

“If only I had a picture of that great activity we did at last year’s retreat…”

Have you ever had this thought when preparing for an event?  You think of things you wish you had as you work on promotional materials, but the opportunity to actually have those has passed.  While organizing an upcoming event, it’s hard to fathom looking ahead to the next event, but, with a little thought, you can save yourself a few “if only” moments down the road.

Here are several ideas you can do during your current event to prepare for future ones:

  1. Take pictures. This is a simple thing to do and a great way to utilize a few volunteers who may be gifted photographers.  Photograph everything – registration, large and small group sessions, candid moments, meals, recreation, free time.  You never know how you might be able to use these photographs in future promotional material.
  2. Get video footage. As with pictures, video everything.  It’s always better to have too much footage from which to draw.  Once the event is over, you can’t recreate these moments.  In addition, by videoing various parts of the retreat, you can see things you might not have noticed because you were in a different spot when they took place.  For example, you might see an easier way to set-up your registration line or find a different way to arrange chairs in your meeting rooms.  It’s similar to an instant replay in sports, only you look at it after the event and can change things for the future.
  3. Interview event attendees. During the event, select several attendees to interview about the actual event.  Ask specific questions about their favorite moments, the accommodations, what they have learned and why others should come in the future.  If there a few people who have had significant life changing moments over the course of the retreat, video their stories.  Having footage of these people, in the moment, at the event location, will carry great weight with potential future guests.
  4. Survey attendees. In addition to gaining information about event details (accommodations, dining facilities, speakers, music, sessions, etc.), ask attendees general questions about their overall experience.  Use their responses as testimonials in promotional material for future retreats.
  5. Observe other events. If other events coincide with yours at the same property, take note of various ways they utilize facilities and incorporate the setting into their programs.  Don’t be afraid to ask their leadership about various ways they program their events.

It is important for all of your guests to sign a waiver giving permission to be photographed or videoed.  This can be included during the registration process.  A simple statement noting that by registering for this event, you acknowledge and agree photos and videos taken may be used in promotional material should suffice.  In securing written testimonials, you can include a statement guests can check regarding whether or not their comments may be published.

What are some ways you prepare for future events during a current one?  Comment below!

 

Ask the Expert: Booking a New Conference

With close to 100 years of experience in the hospitality industry among their team, I knew where to turn for “Ask the Expert” advice on booking a new conference.  I recently asked the sales staff at Ridgecrest Conference Center a simple question:  What is the best advice you can give a group booking a new conference?  Their answers were very insightful.

Here is what they had to say:

  • “If I could narrow down a good piece of advice for a new group it would be a site visit.  The experience is good for the planner and the salesperson.  Hopefully it begins a lasting relationship.  Looking and walking the property provides the planner much more than a website can offer.  A site visit introduces the planner to many ideas and options in housing, meeting space, dining hall and recreation.” – Danny Dalton, at Ridgecrest for 35 years, in sales department for 13
  • “When planning a new conference, it is key to surround yourself with a team of volunteers that have multiple gifts and talents that will help you execute the planning!  Ask a lot of questions, gather resources and ideas and expect the unexpected.  Above all things, stay focused on why you are having the conference in the first place!” – Annette Frisby, serving in hospitality for 22 years, at Ridgecrest for 18
  • “Booking a new conference for a ministry can be tricky, so finding the right place and setting is key.  You want it to be a place your attendees truly want to travel to and a place where the staff understands the goal of the event.  The facility needs to understand this is a new conference and will be willing to help the planner in any way possible to help encourage attendance.” – Angela Beattie, 31 years in hotel industry
  • “My advice would be to plan a site visit.  There are so many details you can cover in a 2-hour visit you would never be able to experience just by looking at the website.  For example, how long does it take to walk from the hotel rooms to the meeting rooms?  Does the campus feel safe and walkable?  What kind of hangout spaces are available around campus?  More importantly, how do the staff treat you?  You can book an event at a 5-star resort with beautiful hotel rooms and incredible amenities, but a rude and unhelpful staff will mar your entire experience.  Experiencing excellent customer service in a Christ-like environment makes the difference between a good retreat and a great retreat.” – Lindsay Sloas, at Ridgecrest for 9 years, in sales department for 3

As you can see, location and surrounding yourself with the right team are great places to start when booking a conference.  By conducting a site visit, you can also see firsthand the event space, hotel accommodations, dining facilities and more.

Thanks for the great advice, Ridgecrest team!  If you are interested in booking a new conference with them, you can find more information at ridgecrestconferencecenter.org.

 

Choosing Onstage Participants

You’ve got the perfect giveaway prizes.  You’ve got a fun, interactive game to play onstage.  You’ve got a great illustration using a few of your guests.  Now, all you need are participants to take part.  In a group of any size, it is inevitable you will have both extroverts and introverts, those that can’t wait to be in the spotlight and those who avoid eye contact at all costs to not be called upon.  So, how do you get people onstage to participate without causing embarrassment or a sudden rush of your guests to the restroom?

Here are a few suggestions for choosing attendees to participate in contests, giveaways or illustrations:

  • For your introverted guests (ideas great for doorprizes):
    • Paper Under the Chair: Prior to the meeting, tape a sheet of paper underneath a few chairs.  When you need participants, have the guests stand up and look under their chairs.  If there is something under their chair, they get to come to the front. If you are pressed for time, you could also place a sticker on a certain page of random event programs and call those from the stage.
    • Who Traveled the Farthest?: Have the audience stand.  Call out various distances, such as “Who traveled more than 50 miles to be here?”  If it applies to the guests, they keep standing; those who traveled less sit down.  Keep calling out greater distances until you only have one person remaining.  Other questions could include shortest distance, years attending the event, age of guests, length of marriage (for a couples retreat), etc.
    • Rock, Paper, Scissors: Play a large game of rock, paper, scissors with your crowd.  Winners play winners and losers sit-down until two contestants remain.  While this is more interactive, it is very non-threatening, easy to play and gets people moving.  (Just be sure to signify if you play your sign on the count of three or after you say three!)
  • For your extroverted guests:
    • On the Body Scavenger Hunt: This is a great idea to get contestants because you choose whether or not to take part.  From the stage, call out items guests may have with them.  These could include a picture of your pet, dental floss, a movie ticket stub, a text from your mom, a black sock, a penny from the 1990s, etc.  The first person to come up to the stage with that item in hand gets to be a participant.
    • Simply Ask: If you need guests for a game or for an illustration, you can always ask for volunteers.  You can take it up a notch by choosing the guest who volunteers with the best dance moves, the craziest outfit or the one who shows the most enthusiasm.
    • Choose Ahead: If you know your guests personally and know someone wouldn’t mind being onstage to play a game, place a sticker on his/her nametag.   Call out that sticker (or stickers) from the stage.

It’s always safest to choose someone who wants to participate rather than someone called on randomly.  For the introverts, they will enjoy the experience a lot more if they know they can simply be a spectator.  For the extroverts, they will enjoy the challenge of trying to be chosen.

What about you?  What are some ideas you have for getting participants onstage?  Comment below!

 

Grace for the Moment

 

The sound system breaks.  The printer ink runs out.  The speaker’s flight is cancelled.  The catering is late.  The event programs are still in the home office.  The registration line is out the door.  The attendees are complaining about the temperature of the meeting room.  The bathrooms are backed up.  The event signage is portrait, and the sign holders are landscape.  The power goes out.  The battery light on your phone is red, and you can’t find the charger.

Have you ever experienced any of these event frustrations?  You’ve planned.  You’ve prepared.  You’ve organized.  Yet, there’s one thing that creeps up unexpectedly (or in many cases, lots of issues arise), and the way you react can have a domino effect over the course of your event.

Here are three things I have learned throughout my time as an event planner:

  1. Expect the unexpected.  When dealing with people, places and technology, there are so many things out of your control.  When unexpected issues arise (and they undoubtedly will), pause and think logically about how best to take your next steps.  Your team will follow how you react to the situation. If you are calm, cool and collected, your team will follow suit.  If you show a sense of frustration or panic, it’s likely your team will respond in the same way.  While you cannot predict the unexpected, you can expect it will happen.
  2. Don’t let a surprise ruin your event.  Embrace creative ways you can respond to the unplanned situation.  Once I was at an outdoor concert when the power went out.  What could have been a quick cancellation with angry concertgoers turned into a very personal, acoustic session with the band sitting on the edge of the stage that was unforgettable. See how you can turn the unexpected into something even better.  Like the concert I attended, it might just turn out to be one of the most memorable moments of your event.
  3. Pray for grace for the moment.  Perhaps the most important thing you can pray for yourself before an event is that you will have grace for each and every moment.  Pray you will react to every situation with grace and love, kindness and gentleness. Moments will undoubtedly come that test your patience – either with a guest, a team member or the event facility staff.  Pray others will see Christ through you in every encounter you have.

When it comes to event planning, you can’t control many outside circumstances.  However, you can control how you react to them.  By preparing yourself to expect the unexpected, embrace surprises and show grace in each moment, you will find the event much more enjoyable!